I know this will sound like blasphemy to much of the classical music world, but I have not adored the music of Mozart or considered him a genius. Precocious, yes; child prodigy, yes. But genius? As a young piano student, I played a few of his piano sonatas and found them tricky with all the…

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Visual art can be made for its own sake. Using line, form, color, composition, texture and all the other artistic elements to create a piece of art is a satisfying engagement for the artist and for the viewer. Visual art can make a political or social statement through the subject matter and the manipulation of…

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The intake person at the hospital was looking down at the sheet of paper with my statistics on it, including my age. Without looking up, she asked,” What prescription meds are you taking?” Her pencil was poised above the blank lines, ready to record my answer. “None,” I responded. Perhaps thinking I hadn’t heard her,…

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I play a lot of solitaire on the computer these days of restricted activity, mostly due to the pandemic. I use Jacquie Lawson’s website as the source for two different games: Spider and Klondike. Spider is the easier of the two; Klondike seems to depend even more on the way the cards are dealt, and…

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Sometimes a piece of music seems to characterize a period in one’s life.  During the hospitalizations for nausea and vomiting that characterized my first weeks of cancer treatment last Fall, I listened over and over again to Mozart’s Requiem. There was a particular performance that I streamed.  It was a recording by Sir Neville Marriner…

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I have lived alone for the last twenty years, and mostly it has suited me. I seem, as a woman of mature years, to need, in equal measure. times of interaction with others and times by myself to recharge and reflect. I still teach college students and adults of other ages, so that stimulus is…

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Life as we have known it before the World Health Organization declared the spread of the coronavirus a “pandemic” on March 11, 2020 has changed utterly. Coping with the stress of all this change— this isolation, this upheaval— can be a challenge. The Alexander Technique can help with this because it centers us in our…

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I love working with performing artists of all “stripes,” but especially musicians. In the classical music world—where I have spent most of my musical life—the discipline is often arduous, and sometimes musicians can lose their dream, their passion for making music, in the task of acquiring a technique adequate to play very demanding works in…

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Many of us find ourselves in front of a screen for hours during the day, mostly to our detriment. We may experience eye fatigue and blurriness of vision, tight and achy muscles, sore joints, mental fogginess, and even sluggish digestion. If these long hours are the result of a job sitting at a desk, there…

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In the previous post, I explored the concept of “end-gaining”—Alexander’s term for ignoring what is happening while we focus all our efforts on achieving a goal. Since end-gaining is the basic mode of our culture, we do it without knowing it. Mostly this is to our detriment. Nowhere is this more evident than in playing…

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